15 Things You Should Give Up To Be Happy

Here is a list of 15 things which, if you give up on them, will make your life a lot easier and much, much happier. We hold on to so many things that cause us a great deal of pain, stress and suffering – and instead of letting them all go, instead of allowing ourselves to be stress free and happy – we cling on to them. Not anymore. Starting today we will give up on all those things that no longer serve us, and we will embrace change. Ready? Here we go:

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Education’s most important goal

 

Critical thinking is possibly the most important educational goal of young people. A person who thinks critically will judge and act from reasoned principles with depth of conviction. He or she is not particularly susceptible to peer pressure, nor prone to rash judgements or emotional reactions to situations. At its deepest level, critical thinking implies that a person has understood and taken to heart those values which will lead to happiness. Here are some hints about how to teach critical thinking:

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Steve Jobs Was a Low-Tech Parent

When Steve Jobs was running Apple, he was known to call journalists to either pat them on the back for a recent article or, more often than not, explain how they got it wrong. I was on the receiving end of a few of those calls. But nothing shocked me more than something Mr. Jobs said to me in late 2010 after he had finished chewing me out for something I had written about an iPad shortcoming.

“So, your kids must love the iPad?” I asked Mr. Jobs, trying to change the subject. The company’s first tablet was just hitting the shelves. “They haven’t used it”, he told me. “We limit how much technology our kids use at home.”

I am sure I responded with a gasp and dumbfounded silence. I had imagined the Job’s household was like a nerd’s paradise: that the walls were giant touch screens, the dining table was made from tiles of iPods were handed out to guests like chocolate on pillow.

Nope, Mr. Jobs told me, not even close.

Since then, I have met a number of technology chief executives and venture capitalists who say similar things: they strictly limit their children’s screen time, often banning all gadgets on school nights, and allocating ascetic time limits on weekends.

I was perplexed by this parenting style. After all most parents seem to take the opposite approach, letting their children bathe in the glow of tablets, smartphones and computers, day and night.

Yet these tech C.E.O.’s seem to know something that the rest of us don’t. Chris Anderson, the former editor of Wired and now chief executive of 3D Robotics, a drone maker, has instituted time limits and parental controls on every device in his home. “My kids accuse me and my wife of being fascists and overly concerned about tech, and they say that none of their friends have the same rules,” he said of his five children, 6 to 17. “That’s because we have seen the dangers of technology first-hand. I have seen it myself; I do not want to see that happen to my kids.”

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Educating in the New Technologies

Technology shapes to a great extent our lives today. We need to be in control of it so that its use helps us grow in virtue.

The new generations are born in an interconnected world unfamiliar to their parents when growing up. They gain quick access to the Internet, social networks, chat rooms and video game consoles. Their learning ability in this area progresses at the same breakneck pace as the development of these new technologies.

From an early age, children and young people are exposed to a world seemingly without borders. This situation offers a lot of benefits, but also involves some risks that make parental closeness and guidance even more necessary.

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